Articles in .NET

REST API in ASP.NET Core
REST API in ASP.NET CORE
This article was written by Irina, Microsoft Certified .NET developer working with REST API in ASP.NET Core. To learn more about our know-how and offering in .NET development, see our Custom .NET Development Services. ASP.NET developers using REST APIs are usually split into 2 categories: the ones that say they work with REST APIs and the ones that claim they are building REST APIs. I am somewhere between them for now, so I say I work with “RESTful-ish” APIs. To better understand REST API an
Dependency Injection
Dependency Injection (DI) or no Dependency Injection in the .NET Framework
In .NET development, we often hear the terms Inversion of Control or Dependency Injection used interchangeably, which is normal considering they refer to the same thing. Inversion of Control is a programming style where a framework or runtime controls the program flow. It was first brought into discussion in Designing Reusable Classes, published by the Journal of Object-Oriented Programming in 1988.  It’s like saying that your car is special because it has wheels. Later, Inversion of control
Revised csproj in ASP.NET Core MVC and Visual Studio 2017
Visual Studio 2017 and ASP.NET Core MVC
This article was written by Irina, one of our senior .NET software developers currently working with Visual Studio 2017 and ASP.NET Core. To learn more about our .NET development know-how and offering, see our Custom .NET Development Services.   If Visual Studio 2015 doesn’t meet your needs anymore, you should give Visual Studio 2017 a try.  The updates to the CLI Tools, the new templates, changes in existing templates and the framework, Docker integration and a lot of other cool stuff w
ASP.NET vs ASP.NET Core
Introduction to .NET Core
This article was written by Irina, senior .NET software developer from our team in Iasi. Learn more about Fortech’s services and know-how in Custom .NET Development.   What is .NET Core? Since the appearance of .NET, from .NET Compact Framework to Silverlight, or from Windows Phone to other Windows Store applications, software developers had to deal with fragmented versions of .NET. Although all these versions should have had a so-called ‘’common’’ runtime, they each ended up bein